Monday, January 19, 2009

Posterior Cleavage!

This post could easily be subtitled "How Life Drawing Changed My Life", or some such equally self-important drivel :) That is to say that often I forget how important it is to draw REAL people...a person who is right there, in the room, with you! I get lazy, though, and use photographs as a poor substitute (although they certainly have their place when creating art and I don't mean to sound ungrateful for the many hours of drawing pleasure they have given me over the years). But when one has at his command the gift of a willing and charming model one would be foolish not to accept.
When I draw from a live model I almost always get a better sense of movement, which muscles flex and those that relax for a pose, and how weight compresses the fleshy parts. I've always had a little trouble with foreshortening, as well, and so I try to draw the model from an angle in order to "work out" that part of my weakest drawing muscle.
I think what happens is I get used to my own visual shorthand, the lines I use for the abs, for example. I like how they look and so I use the same lines repeatedly. Not that I have a problem with doing so but with life drawing I have the opportunity to see different shapes in the body and maybe come up with a few variations on my little shortcuts.

So, the drawing above is Josh again. The Hockey model, etc... And, yes, I actually had him wear clothing for a few of the drawings.

best,
j.

16 comments:

François said...

Well, that drawing certainly has a lot of energy.
The funny thing is that the head of the guy looks a bit larger than the rest of his body, while the proportions of the body look great.

j. said...

Francois - You're probably right about the head, Francois. I often have to scale down the heads of my drawings once I scan them in. I really should pay closer attention as I'm drawing...but even when I think I've got it right the head could still be scaled down a smidge more!

My excuse? I like to draw faces :)

best,
j.

François said...

I didn't say it was a bad thing. It just looks like it's your style, it's very consistent, and yes, it does give us great faces. I like your faces.

j. said...

Thanks, Francois. When I first started out I used to draw everyone at about four heads tall. Those were some big heads. I think when I'm drawing from a model, as I am with this picture, I'd like to get the head size a little closer to normal.

But then again, what's "normal". Rosie O'Donnell has a HUGE head for her 4 foot frame.

I like my faces, too! :)
j.

François said...

So, what you're essentially saying is that you were born to draw MODOK (or the Leader, I guess). You should call Marvel :)

musclsvg said...

It's interesting hear an artist's take on working with a live model. I feel you set your self a real challenge here because the pose you used requires a lot of foreshortening. Proves you're trying to stretch your skills. My only criticism is that for dorsal cleavage you have him sitting on one of the best parts. The glutes. Nothing says butt crack like high, rounded buns and the way they curve down into the back of the leg. That may make me sound like a shallow, horny bastard, but hey! I like that about me.

musclsvg said...

Make that: "It's interesting TO hear an artist's take on working with a live model." Damn! I wish this mail system would let you go back and correct the errors and typos you see as soon as the comment posts.

Johang said...

Hi!
What a wonderful drawing!
I think I'm "in love" with this one!
This is not an easy angle, and you made it like it's...so easy!

Everytime I come to your blog I want to draw something...thank you.

j. said...

Francois - Ha! Now I badly want to draw Modok as some sort of Beefcake model!

Musclsvg - I totally read your first post with the word "to" in it...This is what the internet has wrought. We get what people mean even if spelling or sentences are incomplete.
Moving on...I know what you're saying about the butt cleavage. There are many ways to enjoy it. With Josh seated I reckoned the cleavage was akin to bar wenches (from the days of Conan) with bosom pressed up and heaving out of a corset. Were he standing the cleavage becomes more about the hang of the buttock and the adorable little dimples at the base of the spine.

Just listen to us wax poetic about butt cleavage. :)

Johang - Thank YOU! I appreciate the compliment. I also encourage everyone to draw up a storm. We all did it as kids. Why shouldn't we enjoy the same past time as adults?

best,
j.

Jeff said...

Thanks for another look at Josh. I still have the hockey drawing as my wallpaper because it's so hot. More Josh, please :)

Josh said...

J Bone, you can draw my ass anytime baby! The dimples are kinda cute, huh?

j. said...

Jeff - I'm with you...more Josh! Hey, it's monday...why am I not updating my blog?!

Josh - Gracias! I believe I will take you up on that offer!

best,
j.

grapestain said...

I like that even though you used a model, you're still doing a J Bone face, so it still has a lot of "you" in the drawing. Also, nice butt cleavage.

Andy said...

Personally, I think you should let yourself go when doing life model drawing. You can do back to your sketches and make a finished piece another time, but for me life model drawing should be more about capturing something else: character, pose, mood, feeling, etc. Of course one should be conscious about proportions and getting a certain amount of realism, but sketches are "working drawings". Although this butt cleavage (in my opinion) is quite a work of art! ;)

j. said...

Grapestain - I've tried in the past to get a model's likeness down...but had to give up. It's much too difficult. I like how Josh's drawn face has evolved since I first sketched him from his Hockey player shoot. It can't help but change as I get to know Josh and his features. So it's sort of J.Bone's version of an idealized Josh.

Andy - You are completely right. My life drawings are quite different in execution than my finished artwork. I usually draw with Pitt brush pens so there is an element of illustration to my life drawings as compared to, say, drawing in conte. With marker I can't shade in the same way. Blah blah blah...

I call life drawing a "mechanical" process...but what I mean is that I'm trying to record all of the information supplied by the model, lighting, props, etc...
I'm not trying to create a juicy piece of Beefcake art. I'm not...ahem...aroused by the model (no offense, Josh:) All of that comes later when I work up the image into a final piece.

Hm...I should be saving all of this blather for a step-by-step post.

best,
j.

the sebaceous funk said...

I wish Josh was my model.